“Potluck” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers and mentions of assault. Read at your own discretion.) Surprise! Have a second post this week! It was a shock when I received an email from author Skot Harris’ asking me to review his book, Snapshots at the Fontaine Motel. So imagine my surprise when I received a Goodreads message from…

“The Night Circus” Review

The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern, is a young adult fantasy novel set in ahistorical Victorian London and revolves around the tale of a phantasmagorical circus called La Cirque de Rêves (‘The Circus of Dreams’). Unbeknownst to the circus’ visitors, the circus is powered and is the product of two magicians, Celia and Marco. The…

“Cam Girl” Review

Cam Girl is another highly-anticipated new adult novel by Elliot Wake, published under Leah Raeder. Well, highly anticipated in my book, anyway. It touches on the subjects of sex trade, gender and sexuality, and toxic relationships. Vada Bergen is a talented artist yet she is struggling to make ends meet, and when her drawing arm is…

“Black Iris” Review

Black Iris is a new adult novel by Elliot Wake, published under Leah Raeder, centring around sexuality, gender, mental illness, and not really being able to fit in. On top of that, it’s about intense friendship, sex, violence, and most importantly, vengeance. The story revolves around nineteen-year-old self-proclaimed Unreliable Narrator Laney Keating heading off to college…

“Through the Woods” Review

Emily Carroll’s Through the Woods is unlike any graphic novel I’ve read. Granted, I’m still in the process of immersing my life with them, but that’s another story. It is a collection of five creepy and suspenseful short stories that tickles the more macabre side of your imagination and lures the darkness out of it. Like with…

“Snapshots at the Fontaine Motel” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers and mentions of rape. Read at your own discretion.) Snapshots at the Fontaine Motel is a novel about six teenagers—Kelly, Jill, Ford, Matt, Berger, and Fawn—who are inseparable since kindergarten. So inseparable, in fact, that when Berger accidentally murders bully and rapist, Mason, in an act of vigilante justice, they all…

“Warcross” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) Marie Lu’s Warcross tells of Emika Chen’s journey from being a bounty hunter to becoming an overnight sensation and a wild card player in the international Warcross Championship Games—the virtual reality comba game played, loved, and watched by all. Emika’s been struggling to keep a roof…

“The Child Thief” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers and has mentions of sexual assault. Read at your own discretion.) As part of #ReadersCrossing, I’ve decided to take liberty and start reading the books that’s been sitting in my to-read list for far too long. One of those books is Brom’s The Child Thief. This is one of the books I’ve…

“Howl’s Moving Castle” Review

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) The book, not the beautifully animated Ghibli movie*. That’s a review for another time. Howl’s Moving Castle is one of the most enchanting and creative fantasy books I’ve ever read. Part of me wished that I’d read it when I was younger; this is definitely something eight-year-old…

“American Gods” Review

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) At long last, I’ve finished this behemoth of a book. I meant that in a good way, of course. It’s Neil Gaiman, what’s not to love? American Gods centres around ex-convict, Shadow Moon, who was released early due to the death of his wife, Laura, and best friend,…

“Batman: The Killing Joke” Review

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) In Batman: The Killing Joke, we learn of the Joker’s backstory. Fifty pages may not seem like a lot, especially when dealing with someone like Joker, but this is Alan Moore we’re talking about. If he doesn’t know his way around the medium, then I don’t know…

“Watchmen” Review

Watchmen is really something and a half when it comes to graphic novels. I don’t say it like a bad thing, but when this book has been hailed as ‘one of the most influential graphic novels of all time’, you know there is a lot to offer and dissect. Like most things in life, Watchmen may…

“How to be a Bawse: A Guide to Conquering Life” Review

I bought this book as a gift to a loved one, but they’re not here at the moment. The book’s just lying there in the plastic bag I put it in when I bought it. I took one look at it and thought, ‘Eh, might as well. She’s one of my favourite YouTubers, after all.’ For…

Rupi Kaur’s “milk and honey”

From the Goodreads blurb, milk and honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. It is about the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity. It is split into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose, deals with a different pain, heals a different heartache. I wouldn’t compare it to the overused…

Han Kang’s “The Vegetarian”

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your discretion.) The summary as seen on Goodreads: Before the nightmare, Yeong-hye and her husband lived an ordinary life. But when splintering, blood-soaked images start haunting her thoughts, Yeong-hye decides to purge her mind and renounce eating meat. In a country where societal mores are strictly obeyed, Yeong-hye’s decision…

Neil Gaiman’s “The Ocean at the End of the Lane”

This is my second Neil Gaiman book that I’ve ever read and it didn’t take me long at all to fall in love with it. It opens with a middle-aged man on his way to a funeral but wound up in the place where he used to live as a child. He wanders down to the farm at the…

Matthew Quick’s “Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock”

(This review contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) In year 11, I did a presentation on the Columbine shooting. A lot of effort and research went into it. I did my best to explain what and why it had happened. I listed different reasons, possible causes, and the many impacts it had towards the future of…

Mira Jacob’s “The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing”

I’ve noticed I often go into books knowing little to nothing about it, so I read them with little to no expectations. So when the book I’m reading turns out to be a well-written and touching piece of work, I’m pleasantly surprised. Mira Jacob’s The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing happens to be one of those books. I’ve also…

Malinda Lo’s “Ash”

(This review contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) I love a good Western fairy tale retelling, especially when the author puts a spin to it like, say, if they made the main character a person of colour or made them not-straight. But for a book that aims to do just that (although it is unclear what race Ash is…

M. R. Carey’s “The Girl With All the Gifts”

(This post contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) I’ll be honest. The first time I found out about this book, I thought it was going to be about something different. Like mental illness or disabilities or something. How completely and utterly wrong was I. M. R. Carey’s The Girl With All the Gifts tells a story…

Balli Kaur Jaswal’s “Sugarbread”

This is only my second book by Balli Kaur Jaswal (though, to be fair, she only has two so far and is currently in the middle of writing a third) and she’s already made it to my list of my favourite authors of all time. As much as I liked Jaswal’s first novel, Inheritance (my review of…

Dee Lestari’s “Kesatria, Putri, & Bintang Jatuh” (Supernova #1)

Kesatria, Putri, & Bintang Jatuh (Indonesian for “The Knight, the Princess, and the Falling Star”) is the first in the Supernova series written by acclaimed Indonesian author, Dee Lestari. It recounts the stories of four groups of people: Dimas and Reuben → a young gay couple living in the suburbs of Jakarta. Dimas is a graduate English Literature from George Washington…

Balli Kaur Jaswal’s “Inheritance”

There are two reasons I was interested in reading this book. One, it had a simple, pretty cover (don’t lie; we all judge books by their covers) and two, I had bought Jaswal’s other novel (which I’ve yet to read), Sugarbread, which had been a finalist for the 2015 Epigram Books Fiction Prize. Needless to say, I…