“Ori and the Blind Forest” Review

‘Ori and the Blind Forest’ is a single-player platform fantasy adventure video game, that tells the tale of Ori, a forest guardian, and its partner Sein, a forest spirit. Simply put, their job is to traverse through different areas of the forest and restore the elements of Water, Wind, and Warmth in order to bring…

“Wolf Children” Review

‘Wolf Children’ (or ‘Wolf Children Ame and Yuki’/Ōkami Kodomo no Ame to Yuki) is a Japanese animated fantasy film that heavily reflects themes such as family, loss, hard work and perseverance, acceptance, and unconditional love. It follows the story of a young, widowed woman, Hana, who is left to raise her two werewolf children following…

“Potluck” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers and mentions of assault. Read at your own discretion.) Surprise! Have a second post this week! It was a shock when I received an email from author Skot Harris’ asking me to review his book, Snapshots at the Fontaine Motel. So imagine my surprise when I received a Goodreads message from…

“Depression Quest” Review

‘Depression Quest’ is an interactive game developed by Zoë Quinn and written by Patrick Lindsey. It deals with the subject of depression—hence the title of this game—and revolves around a simple, text-based choice gameplay. Much like a multiple choice quiz, but with no right or wrong answers. You control an unnamed character and are given…

“Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons” Review

‘Brothers: A Tale of Two Sons’ is a puzzle-adventure video game that tells the story of two brothers on a quest to save their dying father. This game is rather reminiscent of classic fairy tales, in my opinion, with various lore and legends spread throughout and mythical creatures lurking in their paths, and also revolves…

“The Night Circus” Review

The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern, is a young adult fantasy novel set in ahistorical Victorian London and revolves around the tale of a phantasmagorical circus called La Cirque de Rêves (‘The Circus of Dreams’). Unbeknownst to the circus’ visitors, the circus is powered and is the product of two magicians, Celia and Marco. The…

“Cam Girl” Review

Cam Girl is another highly-anticipated new adult novel by Elliot Wake, published under Leah Raeder. Well, highly anticipated in my book, anyway. It touches on the subjects of sex trade, gender and sexuality, and toxic relationships. Vada Bergen is a talented artist yet she is struggling to make ends meet, and when her drawing arm is…

“Black Iris” Review

Black Iris is a new adult novel by Elliot Wake, published under Leah Raeder, centring around sexuality, gender, mental illness, and not really being able to fit in. On top of that, it’s about intense friendship, sex, violence, and most importantly, vengeance. The story revolves around nineteen-year-old self-proclaimed Unreliable Narrator Laney Keating heading off to college…

“Queer Eye” Review

“Queer Eye”, once known as “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy”, is a Netflix original series reboot of the early 2000s makeover show in which five gay men—Antoni Porowski (food expert), Jonathan van Ness (grooming expert), Tan France (fashion expert), Bobby Berk (design expert), and Karamo Brown (culture expert, though he is more of the…

“Through the Woods” Review

Emily Carroll’s Through the Woods is unlike any graphic novel I’ve read. Granted, I’m still in the process of immersing my life with them, but that’s another story. It is a collection of five creepy and suspenseful short stories that tickles the more macabre side of your imagination and lures the darkness out of it. Like with…

“Snapshots at the Fontaine Motel” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers and mentions of rape. Read at your own discretion.) Snapshots at the Fontaine Motel is a novel about six teenagers—Kelly, Jill, Ford, Matt, Berger, and Fawn—who are inseparable since kindergarten. So inseparable, in fact, that when Berger accidentally murders bully and rapist, Mason, in an act of vigilante justice, they all…

“Warcross” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) Marie Lu’s Warcross tells of Emika Chen’s journey from being a bounty hunter to becoming an overnight sensation and a wild card player in the international Warcross Championship Games—the virtual reality comba game played, loved, and watched by all. Emika’s been struggling to keep a roof…

“Finding Paradise” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) ‘Finding Paradise’ is a sequel to ‘To the Moon’ and ‘A Bird’s Story’. It features our beloved Sigmund Corp. doctors, Eva Rosalene and Neil Watts, as they help fellow patient, Colin Reeds, fulfil his dream of a perfect life by righting his wrongs and erasing…

“A Bird Story” Review

‘A Bird Story’ is a video game short made by Kan R. Gao, creator of the highly-acclaimed indie game ‘To the Moon’. It tells the story of an unnamed boy with an overactive imagination caring for a wounded bird and flying the world in search for its home. I was rather skeptical of this game…

“The Child Thief” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers and has mentions of sexual assault. Read at your own discretion.) As part of #ReadersCrossing, I’ve decided to take liberty and start reading the books that’s been sitting in my to-read list for far too long. One of those books is Brom’s The Child Thief. This is one of the books I’ve…

“Kingsman: The Golden Circle” Review

(This review contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) I’ve taken a break from writing novel updates because a) I’ve not written that much since the last one and b) I watched “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” recently. And I have some thoughts on it. I loved the first Kingsman movie. It was a fun,…

“Kimi no Na Wa” Review

Kimi no Na Wa is a Japanese animated movie surrounding the fate of high schoolers Mitsuha, who wants much more than her provincial life, and Taki, a privileged boy living in downtown Tokyo. The two start of as complete strangers living their individual lives—until they suddenly switch places. This bizarre occurrence continues to happen and they…

“Howl’s Moving Castle” Review

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) The book, not the beautifully animated Ghibli movie*. That’s a review for another time. Howl’s Moving Castle is one of the most enchanting and creative fantasy books I’ve ever read. Part of me wished that I’d read it when I was younger; this is definitely something eight-year-old…

“American Gods” Review

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) At long last, I’ve finished this behemoth of a book. I meant that in a good way, of course. It’s Neil Gaiman, what’s not to love? American Gods centres around ex-convict, Shadow Moon, who was released early due to the death of his wife, Laura, and best friend,…

Why we need more shows like Brooklyn Nine-Nine

I’ll be honest, I had no interest in Brooklyn Nine-Nine the first time I heard about it. I dismissed it as another sitcom/cop show. I don’t remember what compelled me to finally give it a shot, but I can’t believe that I’ve been putting this show off for as long as I did. Not only…

“Batman: The Killing Joke” Review

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) In Batman: The Killing Joke, we learn of the Joker’s backstory. Fifty pages may not seem like a lot, especially when dealing with someone like Joker, but this is Alan Moore we’re talking about. If he doesn’t know his way around the medium, then I don’t know…

“Watchmen” Review

Watchmen is really something and a half when it comes to graphic novels. I don’t say it like a bad thing, but when this book has been hailed as ‘one of the most influential graphic novels of all time’, you know there is a lot to offer and dissect. Like most things in life, Watchmen may…

“Moonlight” Review

Moonlight is a coming-of-age story about a gay black man, focusing on three different stages of his life, chaptered by his many names: Little (childhood), Chiron (adolescent, also his real name) and Black (adulthood). The movie explores the difficulties he faces with his own sexuality and identity, including the physical, psychological and emotional abuse he receives as…

“How to be a Bawse: A Guide to Conquering Life” Review

I bought this book as a gift to a loved one, but they’re not here at the moment. The book’s just lying there in the plastic bag I put it in when I bought it. I took one look at it and thought, ‘Eh, might as well. She’s one of my favourite YouTubers, after all.’ For…

“One Day at a Time” Review

One Day at a Time (a remake of based on the 1975-84 show of the same name) is a sitcom that follows three generations of a Cuban-American family. It stars military veteran single (and newly-separated) mother, Penelope, who is now a nurse and trying to make ends meet; her headstrong feminist daughter, Elena; vain and sarcastic tween…

“Night in the Woods” Review

Taken from the official website, Night in the Woods tells the tale of college dropout Mae Borowski, who returns home to the crumbling former mining town of Possum Springs seeking to resume her aimless former life and reconnect with the friends she left behind. But things aren’t the same. Home seems different now and her friends…

Rupi Kaur’s “milk and honey”

From the Goodreads blurb, milk and honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival. It is about the experience of violence, abuse, love, loss, and femininity. It is split into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose, deals with a different pain, heals a different heartache. I wouldn’t compare it to the overused…

Han Kang’s “The Vegetarian”

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your discretion.) The summary as seen on Goodreads: Before the nightmare, Yeong-hye and her husband lived an ordinary life. But when splintering, blood-soaked images start haunting her thoughts, Yeong-hye decides to purge her mind and renounce eating meat. In a country where societal mores are strictly obeyed, Yeong-hye’s decision…

“Yuri!!! on Ice” Review

(This review contains spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) I’ve noticed something in common with the things that I love and rave about: they all start out as things that I hear about everywhere (and by that, I mean Tumblr) and I don’t expect much out of it in the beginning. Exhibit A, Hamilton. Same…

Why you should go see Moana. Right now.

This post originally started out as a review—until I realised that I was struggling for words. I have too many feelings. I’ve just finished watching this beautiful masterpiece and if I can say one thing about this movie it is that I am absolutely floored. Words can and cannot describe how ecstatic I was to see Moana and…

“Your Lie in April” Review

Shigatsu wa Kimi no Uso (translates to Your Lie in April) is a Japanese animated series that revolves around Arima Kousei, a piano prodigy who lost his ability to ‘hear’ the sound of his own playing ever since his mother’s death. The story takes place two years after this incident, where he befriends Kaori Miyazono, a…

Neil Gaiman’s “The Ocean at the End of the Lane”

This is my second Neil Gaiman book that I’ve ever read and it didn’t take me long at all to fall in love with it. It opens with a middle-aged man on his way to a funeral but wound up in the place where he used to live as a child. He wanders down to the farm at the…

Toy Story but With Dogs: “The Secret Life of Pets” Review

(This movie contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) If anyone knows me well, then you’d know how much I love a) animated movies—more so than I do live-action ones, and b) dogs (if you didn’t know, now you know. Your life is different now.*) And, boy, did this movie have a lot of…

Matthew Quick’s “Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock”

(This review contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) In year 11, I did a presentation on the Columbine shooting. A lot of effort and research went into it. I did my best to explain what and why it had happened. I listed different reasons, possible causes, and the many impacts it had towards the future of…

Mira Jacob’s “The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing”

I’ve noticed I often go into books knowing little to nothing about it, so I read them with little to no expectations. So when the book I’m reading turns out to be a well-written and touching piece of work, I’m pleasantly surprised. Mira Jacob’s The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing happens to be one of those books. I’ve also…

Malinda Lo’s “Ash”

(This review contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) I love a good Western fairy tale retelling, especially when the author puts a spin to it like, say, if they made the main character a person of colour or made them not-straight. But for a book that aims to do just that (although it is unclear what race Ash is…

M. R. Carey’s “The Girl With All the Gifts”

(This post contains minor spoilers. Read at your own discretion.) I’ll be honest. The first time I found out about this book, I thought it was going to be about something different. Like mental illness or disabilities or something. How completely and utterly wrong was I. M. R. Carey’s The Girl With All the Gifts tells a story…

“Dreamfall Chapters: The Longest Journey” Review

I just want to say before I start that I am currently having one of the biggest fangirl moments on my life. Basically, a few days ago I tweeted a post singing praises about one of the main characters, Saga. And while I was in the process of polishing up this review, actual Ragnar Tørnquist (aka founder of Red…

Balli Kaur Jaswal’s “Sugarbread”

This is only my second book by Balli Kaur Jaswal (though, to be fair, she only has two so far and is currently in the middle of writing a third) and she’s already made it to my list of my favourite authors of all time. As much as I liked Jaswal’s first novel, Inheritance (my review of…

Dee Lestari’s “Kesatria, Putri, & Bintang Jatuh” (Supernova #1)

Kesatria, Putri, & Bintang Jatuh (Indonesian for “The Knight, the Princess, and the Falling Star”) is the first in the Supernova series written by acclaimed Indonesian author, Dee Lestari. It recounts the stories of four groups of people: Dimas and Reuben → a young gay couple living in the suburbs of Jakarta. Dimas is a graduate English Literature from George Washington…

Balli Kaur Jaswal’s “Inheritance”

There are two reasons I was interested in reading this book. One, it had a simple, pretty cover (don’t lie; we all judge books by their covers) and two, I had bought Jaswal’s other novel (which I’ve yet to read), Sugarbread, which had been a finalist for the 2015 Epigram Books Fiction Prize. Needless to say, I…